Available February 6, 2018!

Sixteen-year-old Elena Mendoza is the product of a virgin birth.

This can be scientifically explained (it’s called parthenogenesis), but what can’t be explained is how Elena is able to heal Freddie, the girl she’s had a crush on for years, from a gunshot wound in a Starbucks parking lot. Or why the boy who shot Freddie, David Combs, disappeared from the same parking lot minutes later after getting sucked up into the clouds. What also can’t be explained are the talking girl on the front of a tampon box, or the reasons that David Combs shot Freddie in the first place.

As more unbelievable things occur, and Elena continues to perform miracles, the only remaining explanation is the least logical of all—that the world is actually coming to an end, and Elena is possibly the only one who can do something about it.

"Surreal, brainy, and totally captivating."
-Booklist starred review

"A creative and original tale shot through with quirky humor that entertains while encouraging readers to ponder questions of free will and social responsibility."
-Kirkus

"Hutchinson uses an “Is this the end of all things?” premise to create provocative and moving insights into the angst, wonder, and uncertainty of being a teenager. Elena’s carefully developed relationships...bring additional depth to a thoughtful story about choice and destiny."
-Publishers Weekly starred review

Available Now

Ten teens are left alone in the wilderness during a three-day survival test in this multi-authored novel edited by award-winning author Shaun David Hutchinson.

At Zeppelin Bend, an outdoor-education program designed to teach troubled youth the value of hard work, cooperation, and compassion, ten teens are left alone in the wild. The teens are a diverse group who come all walks of life, and were all sent to Zeppelin Bend as a last chance to get them to turn their lives around. They’ve just spent nearly two weeks hiking, working, learning to survive in the wilderness, and now their instructors have dropped them off eighteen miles from camp with no food, no water, and only their packs, and they’ll have to struggle to overcome their vast differences if they hope to survive.

Inspired by The Canterbury Tales, the characters in Feral Youth, each complex and damaged in their own ways, are enticed to tell a story (or two) with the promise of a cash prize. The stories range from noir-inspired revenge tales to mythological stories of fierce heroines and angry gods. And while few of the stories are claimed to be based in truth, they ultimately reveal more about the teller than the truth ever could.

Contributing Authors
• Brandy Colbert • Tim Floreen • Justina Ireland • Alaya Dawn Johnson • Stephanie Kuehn • E.C. Myers • Marieke Nijkamp • Robin Talley • Suzanne Young

"A compelling, uncomfortable narrative that lets readers know that the tragedy the world can bring to teens transcends socio-economics, gender, and race.”
-Kirkus

"Though the voices are distinct, it’s the overall experience of disparate people finding common understanding that lingers.”
-Publisher’s Weekly

"Many of the stories delve into intense darkness, and there are no easy resolutions, even as the focus rests on a group of diverse people learning to trust each other. A compelling examination of the teen psyche.”
-Booklist Starred Review

A Junior Library Guild Selection

Henry Denton doesn’t know why the aliens chose to abduct him when he was thirteen, and he doesn’t know why they continue to steal him from his bed and take him aboard their ship. He doesn’t know why the world is going to end or why the aliens have offered him the opportunity to avert the impending disaster by pressing a big red button.

But they have. And they’ve only given him 144 days to make up his mind.

Since the suicide of his boyfriend, Jesse, Henry has been adrift. He’s become estranged from his best friend, started hooking up with his sworn enemy, and his family is oblivious to everything that’s going on around them. As far as Henry is concerned, a world without Jesse is a world he isn’t sure is worth saving. Until he meets Diego Vega, an artist with a secret past who forces Henry to question his beliefs, his place in the universe, and whether any of it really matters. But before Henry can save the world, he’s got to figure out how to save himself, and the aliens haven’t given him a button for that.

"This title will appeal not just to fans of speculative fiction and LGBT audiences, but to everyone who believes human beings' insignificance in the broader scale of the universe is reason enough to cherish all of our fellow ants." -School Library Connection

“Hutchinson’s excellent novel of ideas invites readers to wonder about their place in a world that often seems uncaring and meaningless. The novel is never didactic; on the contrary, it is unfailingly dramatic and crackling with characters who become real upon the page. Will Henry press the button? We all await his decision.”
Booklist starred review

“[Henry’s] journey is subtle and hard-won, with meditations on the past, the present, and the future that are equal parts sarcastic and profound. Bitterly funny, with a ray of hope amid bleakness.”
-Kirkus starred review

“Effectively combines the best of elements of Nick Burd's The Vast Fields of Ordinary (Dial, 2009) with hints of Kurt Vonnegut's Slaughterhouse Five. Highly recommended.”
-School Library Journal starred review

“Hutchinson has crafted an unflinching portrait of the pain and confusion of young love and loss, thoughtfully exploring topics like dementia, abuse, sexuality, and suicide as they entwine with the messy work of growing up.”
-Publisher's Weekly starred review

"We Are the Ants is a very complex story about serious subjects. The voices of each character are strong and unique, [and] their language and actions match the situations in which they find themselves."
-VOYA

"[We Are the Ants] is a book about more than love and loss; it’s about struggling to find motivation and not taking the people in your life for granted. A beautiful, masterfully told story by someone who is at the top of his craft."
-Lambda Literary

"Shaun David Hutchinson's bracingly smart and unusual YA novel blends existential despair with exploding planets.”
-Shelf Awareness starred review

Coming February 2017!

Tommy and Ozzie have been best friends since second grade, and boyfriends since eighth. They spent countless days dreaming of escaping their small town—and then Tommy vanished.

More accurately, he ceased to exist, erased from the minds and memories of everyone who knew him. Everyone excerpt Ozzie.

Ozzie doesn’t know how to navigate life without Tommy, and soon suspects that something else is going on: that the universe is shrinking.

When Ozzie is paired up with new student Calvin on a physics project, he begins to wonder if Calvin could somehow be involved. But the more time they spend together, the harder it is for him to deny the feelings developing between them, even if he still loves Tommy.

But Ozzie knows there isn’t much time left to find Tommy–that once the door closes, it can’t be opened again. And he’s determined to keep it open as long as possible.

“An earthy, existential coming-of-age gem.”
-Kirkus starred review

"Wrenching and thought- provoking, Hutchinson has penned another winner."
-Booklist

"Hutchinson ably keeps the tone sardonic and wry, allowing for characters to experience devastation with a clear perspective that all will be survived, and life still holds mysteries and joys."
-BCCB

A Junior Library Guild Selection

Available Now!

A novel with 17 authors, edited by Shaun David Hutchinson. The story centers on a 16-year-old school shooter named Kirby Matheson, with each chapter set before and after the shooting and told by characters who knew him, each trying to answer one question: Why?

Contributing Authors

Kendare Blake
Steve Brezenoff
Delilah Dawson
Trish Doller
Margie Gelbwasser
Christine Johnson
E.M. Kokie
Cynthia Leitich Smith
Tom Leveen
Hannah Moskowitz
Elisa Nader
Beth Revis
Mindi Scott
Brendan and Neal Shusterman
Courtney Summers
Blythe Woolston
Shaun David Hutchinson

“Provocatively and effectively illustrates the multidimensionality of someone considered to be a monster.” -Kirkus

Available Now!

A heartbreaking yet uplifting story of grief about a boy who has lost everything, but finds new hope drawing in the shadows of a hospital. Features a thirty-two-page graphic novel.

Andrew Brawley was supposed to die that night, just like the rest of his family.

Now he lives in the hospital, serving food in the cafeteria, hanging out with the nurses, sleeping in a forgotten supply closet. Drew blends in to near invisibility, hiding from his past, his guilt, and those who are trying to find him. His only solace is in the world of the superhero he’s created—Patient F.

Then, one night, Rusty is wheeled into the ER, half his body burned by hateful classmates. Rusty’s agony calls out to Drew like a beacon, pulling them both together though all their pain and grief. In Rusty, Drew sees hope, happiness, and a future for both of them. A future outside of the hospital, and away from their pasts.

But to save Rusty, Drew will have to confront Death, and life will have to get worse before it gets better. And by telling the truth about who he really is, Drew risks destroying any chance of a future.

“Hutchinson builds believable secondary characters and presents unexpectedly fresh plotting and genuine repartee—the conversations among Drew and his two teen friends feel particularly real and are full of insight and humor. Hutchinson remains an author worth watching.”
-Kirkus Reviews

"The Five Stages of Andrew Brawley broke my heart, then put it back together again. I truly loved this book."
-Bruce Coville

"A wonderfully written book that is more proof that the genre of 'LGBT YA lit' simply knows no bounds."
-Brett Hartinger, author of GEOGRAPHY CLUB

"The Five Stages of Andrew Brawley is as inventive as it is moving. A beautiful book."
-Trish Doller, author of WHERE THE STARS STILL SHINE